Ultimately I wasn’t a ‘cultural fit’: Eddie Steele ‘let go’ as Elks radio analyst after calling out GM Brock Sunderland

Former Canadian defensive lineman Eddie Steele has been punished for calling out Elks general manager Brock Sunderland.

Steele was on The Rod Pedersen Show last Friday and shared his informed takes on the issues with the green and gold.

Because of my comments last week, I was let go from 630 CHED doing the Elks broadcasts. I realize my mistakes in the situation, however I 100% stand by what I said. It pains me to see the organization I love being operated this way. Ultimately I guess I wasn’t a “cultural fit,” Steele shared on Twitter Wednesday morning

The Elks have been mired in controversy all season, with much of it linked back to Sunderland. Top paid head coach Scott Milanovich departed suddenly for the NFL without ever coaching a game for the team and since then multiple former players have fired back at him over the way their contracts have been handled or how their releases were discussed with the media.

Issues in Edmonton worsened when the Elks suffered the league’s first COVID outbreak in August, causing the postponement of their game in Toronto. In total, a league-leading 17 Elks players have entered COVID protocol this season. It’s been reported that Sunderland has not been vaccinated and received a medical exemption after consultation with several doctors.

The 33-year-old Steele played eight seasons in the three-down league, four with Edmonton, winning a Grey Cup with Chris Jones in green and gold in 2015. He suited up in 123 games while making 145 tackles, 18 sacks, three special teams tackles, one interception and forced one fumble. The six-foot-two, 280-pound defensive lineman was selected in the third round, 22nd overall during the 2010 CFL Draft.

Steele officially joined 630 CHED radio in Edmonton in July for game broadcasts to start the 2021 season, but only lasted seven weeks due to speaking his mind. The Elks are currently 2-5, last place in the West Division.

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