Former Pro Bowl QB Gus Frerotte wonders if Chris Streveler can ‘cut the mustard’ in the NFL

Former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte wants to see former CFL signal caller Chris Streveler play again south of the border.

Streveler saw his first extended action in the NFL during the final week of the 2020 regular season with a playoff spot on the line against the Los Angeles Rams.

“You only get a few chances. You gotta come in and prove yourself, there’s not many opportunities. The NFL is very finicky, you have to prove yourself anytime you get out between those white lines,” Frerotte said on The Rod Pedersen Show.

Streveler finished the game completing 11-of-16 passes for 105 yards with one touchdown and one interception, which was brought back 84 yards for a score just before halftime. The Cards lost 18-7 to LA and failed to make the post-season.

“Hopefully he gets another chance, but when you go in and you got an opportunity to really help your team, and it doesn’t happen, there’s a lot of people and scouts — there’s not just one person making that decision,” Frerotte said. “I hope he gets a chance to play again.”

Streveler dressed as the backup all season long. The only other live snaps Streveler had taken — two — came in Week 1 of the season. He converted a third and short situation for a first down in a 24-20 victory over San Francisco. It was the first time a former CFL quarterback recorded an NFL statistic since 2009. Other than that, Streveler held the clipboard.

“I’ve seen a lot of guys make it year-after-year in the NFL, then all of a sudden they get their chance to play and they can’t cut the mustard because it’s not seven-on-seven or practice,” Frerrote said.

“The difference between the game and practice — or whatever you think you’ve been doing — 100 percent different. The speed, how fast everything moves, the intensity, it ramps up 1,000 percent.”

Frerotte played 15 seasons in the NFL and knew how to cut the mustard enough to start 93 games and suit up for 147 while earning a Pro Bowl selection in 1996.

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