The completion of the combine provides an opportunity to reassess the stock of this year’s prospects. Here are ten players who will be rising and falling as a result of this weekend’s combine.

Risers

REC Daniel Petermann, McMaster

Not included in the CFL scouting bureau’s top-twenty rankings from December, Petermann made a case to be considered one of the draft’s top pass catchers with an excellent combine in Winnipeg. Posting a combine-best 4.56 40-yard dash — which, given the poor quality of the testing surface, would likely have been a 4.40 under optimal conditions — and a 39-inch vertical jump, Petermann has all the athleticism required to be a first-round pick.

DL Bo Banner, Central Washington

Banner was one of the players featured on my list of players with the most to gain at the combine and he showed why with an impressive performance in the testing and pass rushing one-on-ones. Possessing the “quick twitch” off the line that teams covet, one scout told me Banner was the best pass rusher “by a mile” in a relatively weak defensive line class.

OL Justin Lawrence, Alberta

Lawrence, another player featured on my combine gainers piece, helped himself by producing respectable testing numbers and performing well in the one-on-ones. Lawrence interviews well and was coached by a fourteen-year CFL offensive lineman at Alberta in Chris Morris — two things that should help teams consider Lawrence as a legitimate member of this year’s strong offensive line class.

RB Ryder Stone, Dartmouth

Stone came into the combine with less buzz than any of the combine’s other ball carriers and outperformed them all in testing. Stone ran a 4.75 40-yard dash — which, again, on a proper surface translates to approximately a 4.60 — and was top-ten overall with times of 7.17 in the three-cone and 4.25 in the shuttle. Interviewing with eight of nine CFL clubs, it’s clear Stone has gained the attention of teams.

DB Isaiah Guzylak-Messam, Wilfrid Laurier

Running a great 40-yard dash (4.60) and showing well in the one-on-ones, Guzylak-Messam showed scouts that he has to potential to be a starting safety in the CFL. The only thing that may prevent Guzylak-Messam from rising more is the overall quality of this year’s class of defensive backs, which many scouts consider the deepest in years.

Fallers

OL Peter Godber, Rice

Players need to fully participate in the combine in order to help their draft stock and Godber, currently ranked fourth by the league’s scouting bureau, was sent home after feeling “sick” on Saturday morning. A client of controversial agent Johnathon Hardaway, Godber’s refusal to participate in the combine following his team interviews will see his stock fall.

DL Kene Onyeka, Carleton

Originally considered to be the top pass rusher in the draft, Onyeka’s stock will fall after the emergence of American-born Bo Banner. Onyeka didn’t help himself with a lackluster performance in the one-on-one pass rushing drills and some mediocre testing numbers that included a 5.15 40-yard dash and just twelve reps on the bench press. Onyeka was one of my players will the most to lose at this year’s combine.

RB Alex Taylor, Western

Taylor didn’t have an awful combine, but he failed to live up to the top-twenty ranking he received from the league’s scouting bureau in December. An elite USports talent, a disappointing 4.90 40-yard dash and relatively lean frame may lead scouts to question whether Taylor’s skills will translate to the pro game.

LB Nelkas Kwemo, Queen’s

Kwemo posted the worst testing numbers of all nine linebackers at the combine in the 40-yard dash (5.11), three-cone (7.85) and shuttle (4.65). Kwemo posted some impressive statistics as a senior (48 tackles, seven tackles for loss, and four sacks), but teams will question how much he’ll be able to contribute at the pro level due to his limited athleticism.

DL Norvell McGlaun, Indiana State

At 5’11, 309, McGlaun simply doesn’t have a pro-ready body at this point in time. Testing poorly in the speed and agility drills, McGlaun completed just twenty reps on the bench — a decent (but far from elite) number for his stature.

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John Hodge is a lifelong follower of the CFL who has been writing about the league since 2014. He is a two-time finalist of the Jon Gott lookalike contest.