3Down Podcast: Did the CFL botch the Euclid Cummings situation?

Drew Edwards and Justin Dunk discuss whether the CFL screwed up the Euclid Cummings case, what free agents got paid, Henoc’s possible landing spots and Henry’s big mouth.

Drew Edwards

Drew Edwards

Drew Edwards is into his eighth season covering the CFL and the Ticats for the Hamilton Spectator. He is the founder and editor of 3DownNation.
Drew Edwards
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Drew Edwards
About Drew Edwards (1494 Articles)
Drew Edwards is into his eighth season covering the CFL and the Ticats for the Hamilton Spectator. He is the founder and editor of 3DownNation.

7 Comments on 3Down Podcast: Did the CFL botch the Euclid Cummings situation?

  1. If the CFL did botch the Euclid Cummings situation it would be on the previous Commissioner. There obviously was no due diligence on his part when Cummings signed in Edmonton last year. Also, Winnipeg has said they were informed of the charges shortly after they were laid. Cummings was a Bomber at the time. Did Winnipeg they do their part and inform the league office of the circumstances?

  2. There are some important legal principles here and I think we need to look to those to put the pieces of this puzzle together. I doubt that the CFLPA would be sitting by and saying nothing if EC’s contract was voided because of the charges. Innocence until proven guilty is a very important legal principle and I’m sure the CFLPA would stand up to defend it. My guess is that there is a clause in the standard CFL contract that says “thou shalt notify the league within X amount of time if you are charged with a criminal offence, and if you fail to do so your contract could be voided.” It would be hard for the CFL to keep track of all the legal jurisdictions that all the players in the league travel through, so a clause like this would make sense. That said, it makes the league look bad when it doesn’t at least track the what goes on in Canada. From EC’s standpoint it’s not hard to guess why he may have played this the way he did. He negotiated a nice signing bonus, but now with the contract now voided he owes that money back to the Lions. But if it’s already in his pocket then the Lions may have to chase him for it, and that may or may not be worth their wile to do.

  3. Bernie, as has been stated by 3Down a couple of times now, the Bombers notified the league that Cummings had been questioned by the police. They did everything by the book

  4. Paul Bomber // March 9, 2018 at 12:56 pm //

    For me, the bottom line is that this suddenly became a problem when everyone found out about it. So the CFL is effectively saying “As long as nobody fines out about what you did, personally, we could care less”. That’s the impression I’m getting at least.
    Its the only thing that makes sense – from a legal standpoint, it appears nothing has actually changed between the time the Bombers spoke to the league and now.

    • I think what has changed is that he was actually charged. The Bombers knew there had been an incident and that it was being investigated, but he wasn’t formally charged until the following April after he had signed with Edmonton. I think what the league is saying now is, “you didn’t tell us, and now that we know we’re voiding your contract.” And I’m guessing that players are contractually required to inform the league if they’ve been charged with a serious offence.

      • Paul Bomber // March 9, 2018 at 2:38 pm //

        oh… ok, so that is something. Thanks for that. You most definitely weaken my point, but I’d still say the league still doesn’t come off looking as good as it could have.

        • I don’t disagree with you there. It would have been easier to understand and forgive a bit if EC had been charged in Georgia, or Jamaica, or some other place far away, but the fact that this happened in Vancouver and they lost track of it does not look good.

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